Program Overview

Program Brochure 2023-24
Science – Health or Pure & Applied
Application deadline

March 1 for Fall Semester / Nov. 1 for Winter Semester

Minumum admissions requirements

Quebec Secondary School Diploma or a level of education that is deemed equivalent by the College.

Prerequisites

Mathematics TS 5 or SN 5
Secondary 5 Chemistry
Secondary 5 Physics

About the program

The two-year pre-university Science Program prepares you for university admission to various Science Programs. At Champlain, we have found that the best way for students to succeed is by making them part of their courses and studying scientific problems the way professional scientists do. In Biology, you will spend less time listening to lectures and more time participating in group activities and studying relevant cases. In Chemistry, you will practice what you learn thanks to a significant lab component in each course. In Physics, option courses pertinent to science and engineering trends complement the curriculum.

Facilities

The Chemistry Department has four fully equipped labs furnished with laptop computers and the latest data acquisition tools. A hands-on approach in the lab allows students to see results in real-time. Our equipment includes an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer, Ultra Violet/ Visible Spectrophotometer, a Gas Chromatograph, two Infrared Spectrophotometers, and three Rotary Evaporators used in organic chemistry to remove solvents from samples through evaporation.

The Physics Department has four fully equipped labs, three used by students for standard experiments, and one for special projects. The labs are equipped with the latest computerized data collection and analysis tools to enhance your experimental skills. Each lab workstation has a computer and sophisticated sensors and data-acquisition devices that allow you to see the outcome of your work immediately.

Students in the Biology Department have hands-on experience with new equipment such as compound and stereo-microscopes, gel electrophoresis units, and thermocyclers for gene amplification techniques.

Labs provide the opportunity to handle live specimens such as fruit flies in genetic studies, pond microbes in ecological assessments, mammalian dissections to explore and compare other forms of life to the human body, and delicate manipulations using an aseptic technique of plant tissue while exploring tissue culture methods.

Science Options

Champlain offers two distinct streams of scientific study: Health Science and Pure & Applied Science. Each stream gives students a solid foundation in biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Health Science includes additional instruction in biology and chemistry to better prepare graduates for university study in medicine and health science research programs. Students in Pure & Applied have more flexibility in their studies and can choose from additional science credits to better suit their academic ambitions.

Off-Campus Activities

Studying and understanding the various ecological systems in our environment is an essential aspect of our Biology labs. Environmental studies at Champlain College Saint-Lambert provide students with the benefits of experiencing light fieldwork during their studies, focusing on water analysis from the St. Lawrence River. Students will become aware of and understand problems dealing with pollution and sustainability. Students have other opportunities to observe life outside of the lab during structured activities and data collection at the Botanical Gardens and the Biodôme, opening their eyes to the similarities and differences observed in the diverse living world.

Health Science Program Grid

Calculus I

Topics include: limits, continuity, differentiation, curve sketching, maxima and minima, differentials, antiderivatives, and
science applications.

General Chemistry I

This course focuses on the understanding of chemical and physical changes in matter. Students will also learn how to
name chemical compounds, review how to calculate concentrations and limiting reactants, apply atomic theory and
quantum mechanics, differentiate between ionic and covalent bonding, write appropriate chemical equations for redox,
single replacement, double replacement, acids and bases, combustion, decomposition, combination and oxide-hydroxide reactions. Students will explore molecular geometry through the use of molecular models and understand the relationship between chemical structure and physical properties of substances, along with their colligative properties.

Mechanics

This course offers a mathematical treatment of the basic laws and principles of mechanics. Content: Vector analysis, forces, friction, equilibrium, one-dimensional motion, motion in a plane, laws of motion, universal gravitation, work energy theorem, potential energy, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, collisions, rotational kinematics and dynamics, and angular momentum.

English

Humanities

French

Physical Education

Calculus II

Topics include: review of differentiation, anti derivatives, definite integrals; application of integrals to areas, volumes and arc length; techniques of integration, improper integrals and infinite series.

General Chemistry II

Subjects covered in this course are based on modern concepts of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics. Topics include: the equilibrium constant expression, gas phase equilibria, thermochemistry, first and second laws of thermodynamics, equilibria in solutions of acids and bases, equilibria in saturated solutions, equilibria in redox systems, electrochemical cells, phase equilibria and chemical kinetics.

Waves, Optics & Modern Physics

This course is an introduction to waves, optics, and selected topics in modern Physics. Content: Simple harmonic motion, harmonic waves, superposition principle, standing waves, resonance, sound waves, Doppler effect, electromagnetic waves (qualitative), Huygens’ principle, reflection, refraction, mirrors, lenses, optical instruments, interference, diffraction, polarization, photoelectric effect, de Broglie waves, wave particle duality, uncertainty principle, the Bohr atom, nuclear physics and radioactivity.

English

Humanities

Complementary

Physical Education

General Biology I

Science students taking this course acquire a broad base in the life sciences. The four unifying concepts of genetics, diversity, cell theory, and evolution combine to form a strong foundation for further study. Topics developed include classical genetics w/some human genetic disorders, evolutionary theory, unity in diversity, and cell reproduction. By following an investigative format, the laboratory activities provide a wide range of practical experience with biological tools and research approaches.

Organic Chemistry I

Organic Chemistry, the chemistry of carbon and its compounds, is essential for an understanding of the chemistry of life processes. Pharmaceutical research heavily exploits organic chemistry principles to synthesize potent bio-active molecules (i.e. medicine/drugs) with the goal of addressing unmet medical needs. Treatment of organic molecules is also key in production of useful materials such as biodegradable plastics, fuels, and solvents. The language, fundamental concepts and theories, as well as recent advances in organic chemistry, will be presented. The accompanying laboratory work will help familiarize the student with the methods and techniques used by the organic chemist in the synthesis, purification and characterization of organic compounds. Topics include: Lewis theory of acids and bases, the kinetics and theory of reaction mechanism, stereochemistry, and systematic nomenclature of organic compounds. A substantial part of the course is devoted to the detailed survey of the properties, reactions and stereochemistry of the following classes or organic compounds: cyclic and acyclic alkanes, alkenes and alkynes, alkyl halides and aromatic compounds. NOTE: Organic Chemistry I is a required course for students registered in the Health Science profile.

Electricity & Magnetism

This course is a study of the fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism. It is designed to provide students with an
understanding of electromagnetic phenomena and some applications. Content: Coulomb’s law, electric field, Gauss’ law, electrical potential, capacitors, physical effect of a dielectric, DC circuits, electrical instruments, Kirchhoff’s rules,
electromotive force and internal resistance, magnetic field, Biot-Savart law, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, inductance,
introduction to AC.

English

Humanities

Complementary

General Biology II

Through a comprehensive introduction to the structure and function of life͛s molecular, cellular and organismal
machinery, this course will assist in showing how scientists answer the question, ͞What makes life tick?͟ An integrated set of laboratory investigations provides supplementary practical experience. Note: This course is recommended for individuals planning to enter the Biological or Health Sciences (including Medicine) at university.

Linear Algebra

Topics include: systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, the dot and cross products, vectors and vector spaces, three dimensional geometry, and applications.

One Option Course

English

French

Physical Education

Pure & Applied Science Program Grid

Calculus I

Topics include: limits, continuity, differentiation, curve sketching, maxima and minima, differentials, antiderivatives, and
science applications.

General Chemistry I

This course focuses on the understanding of chemical and physical changes in matter. Students will also learn how to
name chemical compounds, review how to calculate concentrations and limiting reactants, apply atomic theory and
quantum mechanics, differentiate between ionic and covalent bonding, write appropriate chemical equations for redox,
single replacement, double replacement, acids and bases, combustion, decomposition, combination and oxide-hydroxide reactions. Students will explore molecular geometry through the use of molecular models and understand the relationship between chemical structure and physical properties of substances, along with their colligative properties.

Mechanics

This course offers a mathematical treatment of the basic laws and principles of mechanics. Content: Vector analysis, forces, friction, equilibrium, one-dimensional motion, motion in a plane, laws of motion, universal gravitation, work energy theorem, potential energy, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, collisions, rotational kinematics and dynamics, and angular momentum.

English

Humanities

French

Complementary

Calculus II

Topics include: review of differentiation, anti derivatives, definite integrals; application of integrals to areas, volumes and arc length; techniques of integration, improper integrals and infinite series.

General Chemistry II

Subjects covered in this course are based on modern concepts of chemical equilibrium and thermodynamics. Topics include: the equilibrium constant expression, gas phase equilibria, thermochemistry, first and second laws of thermodynamics, equilibria in solutions of acids and bases, equilibria in saturated solutions, equilibria in redox systems, electrochemical cells, phase equilibria and chemical kinetics.

Waves, Optics & Modern Physics

This course is an introduction to waves, optics, and selected topics in modern Physics. Content: Simple harmonic motion, harmonic waves, superposition principle, standing waves, resonance, sound waves, Doppler effect, electromagnetic waves (qualitative), Huygens’ principle, reflection, refraction, mirrors, lenses, optical instruments, interference, diffraction, polarization, photoelectric effect, de Broglie waves, wave particle duality, uncertainty principle, the Bohr atom, nuclear physics and radioactivity.

English

Humanities

Physical Education

General Biology I

Science students taking this course acquire a broad base in the life sciences. The four unifying concepts of genetics, diversity, cell theory, and evolution combine to form a strong foundation for further study. Topics developed include classical genetics w/some human genetic disorders, evolutionary theory, unity in diversity, and cell reproduction. By following an investigative format, the laboratory activities provide a wide range of practical experience with biological tools and research approaches.

Linear Algebra

Topics include: systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, the dot and cross products, vectors and vector spaces, three dimensional geometry, and applications.

Electricity & Magnetism

This course is a study of the fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism. It is designed to provide students with an
understanding of electromagnetic phenomena and some applications. Content: Coulomb’s law, electric field, Gauss’ law, electrical potential, capacitors, physical effect of a dielectric, DC circuits, electrical instruments, Kirchhoff’s rules,
electromotive force and internal resistance, magnetic field, Biot-Savart law, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, inductance,
introduction to AC.

English

Humanities

Complementary

Physical Education

Option Course

Option Course

Option Course

English

French

Physical Education

Ready to apply?

Click here to find all the information you need to complete your online application.

How to apply