Program Overview

Program Brochure 2023-24
General Social Science
Application deadline

March 1 for Fall Semester / Nov. 1 for Winter Semester

Minumum admissions requirements

Quebec Secondary School Diploma or a level of education that is deemed equivalent by the College.

Prerequisites

High School Diploma

About the program

The general option of the Social Science program allows students the greatest amount of flexibility when selecting social science courses. It allows you to explore the social sciences before making a commitment to a particular subject or area of study. It provides you with a strong background in the seven social science disciplines that will allow you to pursue studies in many programs at university.

Structured & Organized

Teaching in our Social Science program is structured to ensure that courses complement each other. This coherence assures that what you are learning is both practical and purposeful while preparing you for university studies. Social Science is the study of human behaviour and social phenomena through the use of a wide variety of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Social Science involves many bodies of knowledge including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology. Through a variety of courses, students will have the opportunity to study human interactions with other individuals, groups, institutions, cultures and societies using the tools and methods of a social scientist.

Our teachers are dedicated

The teachers work together with students to discuss, examine and debate current social issues and to ensure that students are well prepared for university.

Learning is dynamic

In addition to traditional class lectures, teachers use a wide variety of teaching methods to keep classes interesting and dynamic. Multimedia, computer simulations, sources from current events and the news, and debating are all part of teaching and learning at Champlain College.

You will learn

  • Communicate ideas clearly in written and oral formats
  • Work effectively as a member of a group
  • Use strategies that allow you to reach your short and long-term goal
  • Develop comprehensive research skills
  • Mathematics is available to students who want to meet certain university program entrance requirements. Some restrictions may apply.

The possibilities

Anthropology, Communications, Education (Including Physical Education), English, Foreign Affairs, Geography, History, Industrial Resources, Journalism, Law, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Public Affairs, Religion, Sociology, Specialized Writing (Economics, History, Politics), Social Work

Program Grid

Western Civilization

This is an introductory course in Western history from earliest times to the present. It traces the origins from Ancient Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt, and the great Mediterranean era of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. The changes brought upon by the Middle Ages are examined, including changes to religion, social life, and political organizations. This will lead to the Renaissance and Reformation movements. Attention will also focus on the Political and Industrial Revolutions, and their effects on Science and Technology, Liberalism, Socialism, Nationalism and Imperialism through the 20th Century. This first course in history will include a foundation on themes, definitions, and procedures of the historical craft.

Introduction to Psychology

How do people learn? What is memory and why do we forget? How do brain processes affect my behaviour and even my moods? These and many more questions will be addressed in Introduction to Psychology. This course is compulsory for all Social Science students and will provide them with a strong basis in psychological concepts, theories and research methods. Equipped with this knowledge, students will be able to pursue further studies in Psychology.

Level I Concentration Course

Level I Concentration Course

English

Humanities

Physical Education

Quantitative Methods

Unemployment figures, the success rates of various diets, polls on people’s political preferences, teams’ standings in various leagues, athletes’ records, number of cases of child abuse – data like these surround us. The aim of this course is to give students the tools to assess this kind of information to help them become more confident and critical consumers of numerical or quantitative data. Students will learn how information is quantified and how to read and evaluate numbers reported in the media and in texts and journals.

Macroeconomics

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the principles and tools of macroeconomic (global) analysis. The topics to be treated include: inflation, unemployment, money and banking, taxation, government spending, exchange rates, business cycles, national income, international trade and economic growth.

Level I Concentration Course

Level II Concentration Course

English

Humanities

French

Complementary

Introduction to Methodology

Students will examine the entire process of doing research in the social and human sciences. They will see what is meant by the scientific method, the difficulties involved in doing research with humans and ethical considerations that affect researchers’ work. Students will learn which research techniques are used in the different disciplines they are studying.
They will use their knowledge of quantitative methods and research techniques to evaluate research reported in the media, texts and journals, and they will create, implement and report on a research project of their own.

Level II Concentration Course

Level II Concentration Course

English

Humanities

French

Physical Education

Integration Seminar in the Social Sciences

This course offers students the unique opportunity to consolidate some of the links among the disciplines in the social
sciences. Each student will select and research a social issue, write an academic paper, and present their findings orally. In the paper, the student will analyse the issue from two social science disciplines and one theoretical framework. This process will serve as an excellent preparation for university studies. The successful paper will also meet the criteria for the Program’s Comprehensive Assessment. NOTE: The I.S.S.S. course must be taken at Champlain College Saint-Lambert only in the final semester of the Social Science program. Students will not be granted permission to enrol for this course at another Cegep.

Level II Concentration Course

Level II Concentration Course

Level II Concentration Course

English

Complementary

Physical Education

Choose your Level I or Level II Concentration Course from:

Anthropology, Biology, Business, Economics, Geography, History, Sociology, Political Science and Psychology.

Ready to apply?

Click here to find all the information you need to complete your online application.

How to apply