Program Overview

Program Brochure 2023-24
General Studies
Application deadline

March 1 for Fall Semester / Nov. 1 for Winter Semester

Minimum admission requirements

Quebec Secondary School Diploma or a level of education that is deemed equivalent by the College.

Prerequisites

High School Diploma

About the Program

The general option of the Social Science program allows students the greatest amount of flexibility when selecting social science courses. It allows you to explore the social sciences before making a commitment to a particular subject or area of study. It provides you with a strong background in the seven social science disciplines that will allow you to pursue studies in many programs at university.

Starting in Fall 2023 there will be two streams within the General Studies in Social Science profile – With Math and Without Math.

Structured & Organized

Teaching in our Social Science program is structured to ensure that courses complement each other. This coherence assures that what you are learning is both practical and purposeful while preparing you for university studies. Social Science is the study of human behaviour and social phenomena through the use of a wide variety of both qualitative and quantitative methods. Social Science involves many bodies of knowledge including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology and sociology. Through a variety of courses, students will have the opportunity to study human interactions with other individuals, groups, institutions, cultures and societies using the tools and methods of a social scientist.

Our teachers are dedicated

The teachers work together with students to discuss, examine and debate current social issues and to ensure that students are well prepared for university.

Learning is dynamic

In addition to traditional class lectures, teachers use a wide variety of teaching methods to keep classes interesting and dynamic. Multimedia, computer simulations, sources from current events and the news, and debating are all part of teaching and learning at Champlain College.

You will learn

  • Communicate ideas clearly in written and oral formats
  • Work effectively as a member of a group
  • Use strategies that allow you to reach your short and long-term goal
  • Develop comprehensive research skills
  • Mathematics is available to students who want to meet certain university program entrance requirements. Some restrictions may apply.

The possibilities

Anthropology, Communications, Education (Including Physical Education), English, Foreign Affairs, Geography, History, Industrial Resources, Journalism, Law, Literature, Philosophy, Political Science, Public Affairs, Religion, Sociology, Specialized Writing (Economics, History, Politics), Social Work

General Studies in Social Science (With Math) Program Grid

*This grid comes into effect as of Fall 2023

Physical Education

Humanities (Knowledge)

English

Introduction to Social Science

What is research? What is science? How do the disciplines of Anthropology, Economics, Geography,
History, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology contribute to our understanding of human life? To answer these
questions, students explore the process of scientific research and communication in the social sciences. Specifically,
they learn to carry out a literature search, evaluate the relevance and reliability of varied information sources, summarize these sources using scientific conventions and communicate their ideas clearly, both orally and in written form.
Throughout, students also learn about, and experience, the role of teamwork and feedback in the research process.

Introduction to World History

What connects humans throughout history? Discover fascinating people and events that changed
the world and tie it together. After setting the scene with premodern global history, dive into the state of the
world in the 1500s, including colonialism, imperialism, slavery, and cultural assimilation. In the Modern Era,
juxtapose Enlightenment ideals and global revolutions with the slow and difficult application of human rights
and creeping industrialization. Conclude your journey with the past century, its conflicts, authoritarianism,
nationalism, decolonization, technological revolutions, globalization, and fights for the environment and civil
rights. Along the way, add to your historical, research, and writing skills.

Introduction to Psychology

How do people learn? What is memory and why do we forget? How does the brain work? You get to
answer these and many more questions in Introduction to Psychology. The topics discussed help you understand
how various factors can influence your behaviour and brain processes in different situations and give you a new
perspective on some of your own experiences. Strategies to help with your memory, study habits, and learning
methods are discussed, which will help you apply course topics to your own life.

Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry

Linear algebra studies linear equations and their manipulations and applications. It has extensive applications in the social sciences, especially since nonlinear models can often be approximated by linear ones. Topics include:
systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vectors, and vector geometry. Applications include: optimization
problems, Leontief models and Markov chains. Examples and other applications will be drawn from economics, business, and social sciences.

English (Effective Communication for College Studies)

French Block A

Quantitative Methods

How do we collect and quantify data? How does the data we gather help us understand the social
world? In Quantitative Methods, we learn descriptive and inferential statistical operations, and how to analyse
statistics in popular media and scholarly texts. Summarizing, interpreting and critically evaluating quantitative information, we become familiar with the fundamental concepts and basic techniques of the quantitative methods
in the Social Sciences.

Calculus 1

Differential calculus studies instantaneous rates of change. Mathematically, it answers the question: what
is the slope of a curved line? Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative and differentiation, curve sketching,
rates of change, and extrema. Applications include: marginal analysis, optimization, and demographics. Examples and
other applications will be drawn from economics, business, and social sciences.

Elective

One of the following (Student Choice):
385-S01-LA Introduction to Political Science
381-S01-LA Introduction to Anthropology
387-S01-LA Introduction to Sociology
401-S01-LA Introduction to Business

Introduction to Economics

Learn the principles and tools of macroeconomic analysis and apply them to understand real world
economic events and policies. Topics include: economics systems, economic incentives, macroeconomic indicators (such as inflation, unemployment, and gross domestic product), business cycles, economic growth, fiscal and
monetary policies, and the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model.

Introduction to Geography

Every day we interact with the world around us and we unknowingly leave a trace. These patterns can be explored in global, regional, and local contexts to better understand our role in the world, both as
individuals and collectively within society. Geographic perspectives on cultural, socio-economic and physical
landscapes enable us to address contemporary issues in society and to prepare ourselves for environmental
challenges. Through active learning, the unique aspects of geographic spatial relationships and human-environment interactions are experienced.

English

Physical Education

French Block B

Humanities (World Views)

Complementary

Qualitative Methods

How do we distinguish between scientific and non-scientific knowledge? What are the ethical guidelines that direct research in the social sciences? What are the theories and techniques used by social scientists to
obtain and analyze qualitative data? Investigate the social world using qualitative research methods such as interviews, participant observation and thematic analysis. Apply your critical thinking skills to contextualize research
results and produce scientific research papers.

Elective

One of the following (Student Choice):
201-SC2-LA Calculus 2
Level 1 Concentration Course (Student choice)
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Elective

One of the following (Student Choice):
101-SHB-LA Human Biology
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Physical Education 103

Humanities for Social Science Programs

English

Complementary

Final Integrative Research Project

Scholarly conventions of the social sciences dictate how we plan, carry out and evaluate academic
work, including following ethical guidelines and expressing ideas clearly. The final integrative research project
is a guided multidisciplinary comprehensive assessment of the knowledge and skills acquired through the social
science program. It offers a broadened understanding of the social world and the chance to evaluate one’s own
learning journey in the Social Sciences.

Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

General Studies in Social Science (Without Math) Program Grid

*This grid comes into effect as of Fall 2023

Physical Education

Humanities (Knowledge)

English

Introduction to Social Science

What is research? What is science? How do the disciplines of Anthropology, Economics, Geography,
History, Political Science, Psychology and Sociology contribute to our understanding of human life? To answer these
questions, students explore the process of scientific research and communication in the social sciences. Specifically,
they learn to carry out a literature search, evaluate the relevance and reliability of varied information sources, summarize these sources using scientific conventions and communicate their ideas clearly, both orally and in written form.
Throughout, students also learn about, and experience, the role of teamwork and feedback in the research process.

Introduction to World History

What connects humans throughout history? Discover fascinating people and events that changed
the world and tie it together. After setting the scene with premodern global history, dive into the state of the
world in the 1500s, including colonialism, imperialism, slavery, and cultural assimilation. In the Modern Era,
juxtapose Enlightenment ideals and global revolutions with the slow and difficult application of human rights
and creeping industrialization. Conclude your journey with the past century, its conflicts, authoritarianism,
nationalism, decolonization, technological revolutions, globalization, and fights for the environment and civil
rights. Along the way, add to your historical, research, and writing skills.

Introduction to Economics

Learn the principles and tools of macroeconomic analysis and apply them to understand real world
economic events and policies. Topics include: economics systems, economic incentives, macroeconomic indicators (such as inflation, unemployment, and gross domestic product), business cycles, economic growth, fiscal and
monetary policies, and the aggregate demand and aggregate supply model.

Introduction to Psychology

How do people learn? What is memory and why do we forget? How does the brain work? You get to
answer these and many more questions in Introduction to Psychology. The topics discussed help you understand
how various factors can influence your behaviour and brain processes in different situations and give you a new
perspective on some of your own experiences. Strategies to help with your memory, study habits, and learning
methods are discussed, which will help you apply course topics to your own life.

English (Effective Communication for College Studies)

French Block A

Complementary

Quantitative Methods

How do we collect and quantify data? How does the data we gather help us understand the social
world? In Quantitative Methods, we learn descriptive and inferential statistical operations, and how to analyse
statistics in popular media and scholarly texts. Summarizing, interpreting and critically evaluating quantitative information, we become familiar with the fundamental concepts and basic techniques of the quantitative methods
in the Social Sciences.

Elective

One of the following (Student Choice):
385-S01-LA Introduction to Political Science
381-S01-LA Introduction to Anthropology
387-S01-LA Introduction to Sociology
401-S01-LA Introduction to Business

Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Introduction to Geography

Every day we interact with the world around us and we unknowingly leave a trace. These patterns can be explored in global, regional, and local contexts to better understand our role in the world, both as
individuals and collectively within society. Geographic perspectives on cultural, socio-economic and physical
landscapes enable us to address contemporary issues in society and to prepare ourselves for environmental
challenges. Through active learning, the unique aspects of geographic spatial relationships and human-environment interactions are experienced.

English

Physical Education

French Block B

Humanities (World Views)

Qualitative Methods

How do we distinguish between scientific and non-scientific knowledge? What are the ethical guidelines that direct research in the social sciences? What are the theories and techniques used by social scientists to
obtain and analyze qualitative data? Investigate the social world using qualitative research methods such as interviews, participant observation and thematic analysis. Apply your critical thinking skills to contextualize research
results and produce scientific research papers.

Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Elective

Two of the following (Student Choice):
101-SHB-LA Human Biology
Level 1 Concentration Course (Student choice)
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Physical Education 103

Humanities for Social Science Programs

English

Complementary

Final Integrative Research Project

Scholarly conventions of the social sciences dictate how we plan, carry out and evaluate academic
work, including following ethical guidelines and expressing ideas clearly. The final integrative research project
is a guided multidisciplinary comprehensive assessment of the knowledge and skills acquired through the social
science program. It offers a broadened understanding of the social world and the chance to evaluate one’s own
learning journey in the Social Sciences

Elective

Three of the following (Student Choice):
360-QM2-LA Quantitative Methods 2
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)
Level 2 Concentration Course (Student choice)

Ready to apply?

Click here to find all the information you need to complete your online application.

How to apply